Monday, January 1, 2018

Shares and Requests

Here is a place to drop both your own shares and requests for shares in a central place everyone can check - you know how this works by now.

150 comments:

Moe said...

Richard Marks - Check this out some really good old soul. Thanks to poster ipodonok http://www64.zippyshare.com/v/HAAjOjKM/file.html

Anonymous said...

Hi! Recently heard songs by Little Miss Janice on various compilations. What a great voice! Learned she stopped singing secular music around 1973, and sang only gospel after that. Does anyone know if she did any gospel recordings? Her impassioned singing would truly grace gospel music. Thanks everyone. Her lol-ness recently requested only gospel music. Have since learned that all the music KC and friends post are national treasures. With appreciation, lol-ness.

Moe said...

Thanks for all the Gospel posts! I am looking for artists or comps on the HOB (House of Beauty) label. I notice they have alot more soul/funk feeling to their gospel. Thanks.

Feilimid O'Broin said...

I haven’t yet had the opportunity to listen to the two most recent selections but am looking forward to doing so. Instead, I am writing to thank Gus, for posting “Louisiana Blues.” I was fourteen when I bought my first album, Little Walter’s “Hate To See You Go.” I was awestruck by the sounds he was able to create on his harp. In particular, on “Blue Midnight” and other songs, I thought he evoked the sounds of a saxophone and played beautifully and powerfully.

Listening to Muddy Waters sing caused me to reflect on how very fortunate we are to have grown up during a time when many of the early blues musicians and singers were still living. During my teenage and young adult years, I never had much money but I was able to see Muddy Waters and B. B. King, and lesser blues musicians such as Roy Bookbinder, play in small settings. The last of the first and second generation blues musicians will soon be gone and I wonder whether in a decade or so their recordings will be regarded as museum pieces or quasi-sacred songs compelling today's blues musicians to faithfully play them as the original artists did. To try to express the thought better, I wonder whether musicians like Otis Taylor and Robert Cray will be part of a minority of artists creating or attempting to create a modern blues that is progressive and often syncretic

I’m not suggesting that we let the dead bury the dead and reject all imitators who reverently seek to play and sing what has been played and sung so many times before but I want the blues to be as creative and expansive as it was during its early years, the era of first and second generation blues musicians and not become a fossil to be preserved in musical amber. We already have the music of Robert Johnson, Skip James, and giants whom we were born too late to see live as well as the giants we were able to see such as King and Buddy Guy.

Feilimid O'Broin said...

Given their uniqueness and creative genius, we will not see their like again. Consequently, I am especially concerned that the majority of blues musicians today are either from Europe or, in this country, Canada, and Australia, of European descent. Eric Clapton, Stevie Ray Vaughn, Jo-Ann Kelly, Rory Block, and others are living proof that the blues is not a racially or ethnically exclusive genre specific to or best played by African-Americans; however, I wonder whether the blues can still retain its original soul and the historical importance of its roots; that is, the culture and events from which it developed will be understood, if young African-American musicians and audiences view it as a relic from a time of brutal oppression and de jure, as well as more widespread de facto, racism.

I have African-American friends who regard the blues with the same ambivalence many Jews in Israel regard Yiddish and many Irish in Ireland and here regard Irish Gaelic. Specifically, they recognize that the blues represents an integral part of African-American history and culture and is the parent of so many other genres of American music, but listen to other music because the blues seems regressive, represents the music of old folks, or evokes memories of Jim Crow, rural poverty, the great exodus northwards from the deep South, and the United States prior to the significant, albeit too few, advances towards equality that were achieved through litigation, civil disobedience and protests, and the various unorganized and often destructive rebellions more commonly described as riots in the mainstream media. If played and appreciated largely by Europeans and their descendants will the blues become so divorced from its roots that it into a distinctly different genre? Will it still value its creators and still be creative, rather than largely imitative be echoes of the voices of the dead? Will its singers be songsters as defined by Mance Lipscomb or will they focus exclusively on restrict their music? Is the blues an endangered language that will cease to expand its musical vocabulary, become extinct during the lives of our children and grandchildren, and no longer be presented live? I am biased to the extent that I think blues is best presented live in juke joints and small clubs in or, alternatively, at outdoor festivals which folks drink, smoke, and/or dance to unwind from the pressures of the work week and daily life Sweat and a certain raucousness, including verbal and physical audience participation, rather than merely silent, reverential, and stationary listening, also strike me as integral to appreciating the essence of the music.

It’s funny how one song can set the mind spinning with thoughts or memories, or evoke strong emotions, but it is also evidence of the greatness of music. And, to quote Bob Marley, “one good thing about music, when it hits you feel no pain.” I’ll end this by expressing best wishes for Lazz and the hope that he is well. His messages and those of others really lifted my spirits when I was ill but I sincerely hope that my comments and the inquiries and comments of others and his lack of response means that, rather than being ill, he is immersed in work or some personal project and hasn’t had time available to pen his witty, informative, and sometimes downright sardonic or cynical comments. I miss his unique and always well-informed perspective. As usual, the words "succinct" and "concise: (and maybe even "coherent') are not part of my vocablary. Please excuse any typos.

Goneahead said...

@Feilimed,

I am not a musician, but I hope you dont mind if I weigh in. I grew up listening to the over polished pop of the 70s and 80s. Then one day, I happened to stumble on some old cowboy music. As a wet-behind the ears teenager, I had never heard anything like it--so I went looking for more. Cowboy music led to bluegrass and bluegrass to the blues. In past 3 decades, I have seen a slow shift--used to be people couldn't even comprehend I was listening to music recorded before the 60s. Thanks to blogs and forums and albums like Oh Brother, more and more people are listening to the early and classic blues. We now have young musicians like Carolina Chocoiate Drops that are starting to explore not just blues,but the roots of blues. I think we are on a cusp and in a few years, we will see more and more fusion bands (for lack of a better word) building and expanding on the early and classic blues. It definitely seems like that's where music is heading.

Feilimid O'Broin said...

Thanks for responding and I absolutely agree with you. I, too, have classic bluegrass and some cowboy music, not to mention Cajun and zydeco, which I prefer in French and Creole, respectively. However, I greatly enjoy what Rhiannon Giddens and other alumni of the Chocolate Drops are doing and have all of their recordings. I hear Otis Taylor trying to do the same with the blues, and Taj Mahal's been seeking and achieving the same for years and can be best described as a modern songster, to use Mance Lipscomb's wonderful term. I really welcome that expansion of the genre and fusion with other influences, such is the history of music, without it we wouldn't have jazz, Afrobeat, reggae, and much of modern music.

My concern is that I access so many blues blogs and, aside from the blogs presenting the classic greats we all know or singers from that era who were overlooked or forgotten and deserve to be heard, there seems to be an abundance of contemporary recordings by imitative "electric blues bands" from the Netherlands, Sweden, Italy, France, England, this country, and Australia composed largely of young white musicians who assume that recreating the original music with an occasional flourish of rock guitar solos constitutes the blues and is authentic. It strikes me as great listening when one is drinking or at a raucous outdoors festival but inspired, subtle, and authentic it ain't.

Mind you the blues has been played well by many whites as Gerard Herzhaft observes in his great encyclopedia when he discusses, for example, Dave Van Ronk. Van Ronk had profound respect for the old songs and even more for singers like Mississippi John Hurt; however, when he sang the blues he sang in his own creative style. I refuse to believe any genre can only be articulated well by one ethnic group and I believe that Keb' Mo', Robert Cray, Guy Davis, Rory Block, Gary Clark, Jr., and many of the really

Feilimid O'Broin said...

good blues musicians active today are pursuing similar directions to Van Ronk; that is, retaining the heart of the music while expanding its vocabulary. The late folk musician Bill Morrissey also did a great reworking of Hurt's music; his version of “Avalon Blues” is beautiful an original. Otis Taylor certainly is and has been striving to reclaim the banjo as an African instrument in African-American music and the blues. Artists like Ry Cooder and Hans Theesink and Terry Evans rely on their musicianship and incorporation of other influences to make the music their own. Our own Guitar Gus of this blog and his O. T. band played some inspired, creative blues with Earl Green as lead singer and can be seen and listened to on YouTube and on Gus’s blog. Green is charismatic and embodies the concept of cool; he is wonderful to watch perform. Gus is too modest about his playing to take this remark seriously but I greatly enjoy hearing Green and the band put their own stamp on the music as if the Thames had a delta tradition. Based on Gus’ recommendation, I have purchased several of Green’s recordings and I haven’t been disappointed yet.

On the other hand, so many so-called blues bands band aren't really creative and the music seems devoid of real life. In my uninformed opinion, unless they can achieve the musicianship of a Clapton, Peter Green, or a Johnny Winters, or leave their own imprint on the music, they're merely dusting off the songs and playing them loud as blues rock as if doing so is what constitutes electric blues. What’s irksome is that the blues is not an inherently restrictive genre yet so much of contemporary blues by such bands seems limited. The notes may be there, but the soul isn’t.

In expressing these views, I may sound like I'm pining for the good ol' days, I'm not. Instead, I want that creativity today that the Wolf, Waters, Hurt, Lipscomb, and others expressed in their time to be infused into the music played today. Much of what they did had been done in some fashion before but not as they did it and it made all the difference. Then, too, there's what Little Walter was able to do with a harmonica. The era and events that fostered the original music and the aforementioned musicians won't return and blues or rock calling itself blues has too often become stale and too predictable. The music has to progress to be alive and creative. Moreover, one can recreate the standards in such a way that they are memorable and unique. Among others, Cassandra Wilson does so incredibly well in jazz and Marva Wright did so with the blues. I owe the King for introducing me to the music of the truly wonderful Ms. Marva.

Feilimid O'Broin said...

I remember when the Blues Brothers recordings were popular in the 1980s among so many people I knew and I wondered why a listener would choose to buy their records rather than buy Sam and Dave, Aretha, Sam Cooke, etc., all of whose music was still available. After all, at a minimum, the Blues Brothers movies actually featured folks like Aretha, Sam Moore, Matt Murphy, and others so there really was no rationale for a listener buying the Blues Brothers' albums and equating them with the originals. To buy a soundtrack because one enjoyed the movie is one thing, to trumpet the Blues Brothers as great blues and rhythm and blues is another. Of course, there may have been some hidden rationale given that that was also near the end of the era of the "disco sucks" crowd which appeared to me to be denouncing the blackness of, rather than the quality of disco music. Certainly some of the folks I knew who thought the Blues Brothers great also opined that disco sucked and race is almost always below the surface, if not obvious, in any discussion of culture in the United States.

In discussing new directions in music, Poppachubby and I once exchanged messages on what Robert Glasper was trying to do with jazz and hip-hop. I find what Glasper is doing both intriguing and exciting; I enjoy his music and, more importantly, his creativity greatly. I still recall critics jumping Mile Davis' bones for playing Michael Jackson and Cindy Lauper songs in the 1980s as if he had sold out and compromised his standards by playing pop songs. I thought what he was doing was creating a new audience for his music that might not only enjoy the contemporary stuff he was playing but just might like it enough to get curious and explore "Bitches' Brew", "Live/Evil", and other recordings he made a decade or so earlier when he began incorporating rock influences into his music, They might even be tempted to explore "Kind Of Blue", "Sketches Of Spain" or other of his earlier recordings.

Feilimid O'Broin said...

A great memory (at least in my mind) that I have from that time is my wife and I going to eat at a Church’s Chicken in Mattapan, a neighborhood of Boston, one Summer night. Church’s had external speakers and, in what we in Boston call wicked muggy weather, it was blaring Davis’ version of “Human Condition” into the streets in the same way that the reggae music shops in Codman Square blared Gregory Isaacs and others to do their bit to recreate Kingston in Dorchester. People around Church’s appeared to be lifted by and walking in rhythm with the music and I remember thinking and then remarking to my wife, “Man, all of these people are listening to Miles Davis’ and enjoyment of the music is making the sweltering night a bit more enjoyable.” I had seen Davis play three sets in the Jazz Workshop, an appropriately smoke-filled, dark club in which people were crowded around small tables, drinking, smoking, and rhythmically and sagely nodding and tapping to the music he played. True to form, Davis played most of the night with his back to us in the audience and I don't recall him speaking. The critics loved that night but I wonder how many of them in their quest for preserving the old Davis would have appreciated the infectious joy his music was bringing to the street that night my wife and I decided to try Church's. After all, in their knowledgeable opinions, Davis was selling out and no longer “challenging himself” or being sufficiently innovative. Alternatively, I thought he was expanding the music in the same way that Coltrane did when he played "My Favorite Things." I love Coltrane and most of his albums but I still remember the sheer joy of hearing his version of "My Favorite Things" as a child. In the end, I think the blues today has to evolve if it's to capture a younger and especially an African-American audience again; however, it also has to have some heart and soul in it and be grounded in the blues, and I don't hear that as often as I do recycling of the old chestnuts or new inferior blues rock songs with hackneyed lyrics presented as electric blues.

On the other hand, I find Habib Koité and Eric Bibb or Toumani Diabaté and Taj Mahal recording together as wonderful as I did Ali Ibrahim "Farka" Touré’s and Ry Cooder’s “Talking Timbuktu.” Among others, they, Otis Taylor, and the Carolina Chocolate Drips showed me where the music could go to renew itself and grow. I hope we see many more efforts to incorporate other influences in the blues that will still strike us as wonderfully creative and exciting while be discernible to our ears as part of a continuum of that great genre. (Of course, I sometimes teeter on the brink of falling into Harold Baptiste's line of thinking that genres are for record shops and all music is music without restrictive definitions such as genres.)

By the way, be assured that I am not a musician either; in fact, far from it. Other than loving so many genres of music with my ears and gut, I am musically illiterate and my comments may strike a musician or someone who understand the structure or history of music as laughable and simplistic. However, several years ago a certain musically knowledgeable New Orleans sage and proprietor of a certain southern blues blog chastened me for explaining to him that I didn’t comment in response to his posts because I thought my remarks were too uninformed and ignorant when compared with the comments of so many others who contributed and who were actually musicians or in the music business. If there is a manner of typing that is comparable to closing one’s eyes and jumping into the chasm with the naive hope that one lands uninjured and on one’s feet, that is what I do when I comment here. I hope I’ve landed on my feet again with these comments on this topic, but if not, I hope others will contribute their thoughts.

KingCake said...

I have always been a bit confused that folks made such an issue about what direction Miles was facing and missed that he was actually sticking his head into the drum kit - while sax players most often play off of their keyboard men, trumpet players are most often joined to a drummer - no mistake that Miles had drummers like Kenny Clarke, Philly Joe Jones, Tony Williams and Joe Chambers; no mistake that Max had trumpets like Clifford, Booker Little, Kenny Dorham and Cecil Bridgewater - Art always had monsters on trumpet too.

Feilimid O'Broin said...

I don;t disagree; however,, during the three sets I sat through, he didn''t face nor speak to the audience at any time even when the music wasn't playing; there were no band intros or song introductions. I attributed it to his eccentricity and it didn't affect my enjoyment of the music After all, I was there for the music not for his charm. You can be sure that the critics who reviewed the performances commented. Miles was Miles, but that night the music was intense and he was incredible. The larger issue was those same critics attacking him a decade later for playing popular music and accusing him of slacking off by doing so. I still think they were wrong. Maybe they didn't listen to ;his haunting introduction to "Time After Time" on the DVD of his performance in Montreal. They certainly didn't see the effect of the music on the crowd outside of Church's on that "wicked muggy" night. Then again, as a Patriots fan, I enjoy Bill Belichick press conferences and think they're funny; that monotone deadpan performance that irks the sports media so much makes him the Jackie Vernon or Steve Wright of football to some of us crazed Bostonians. As for me, were he still alive, I'd pay as quickly as possible to ensure I had a ticket to see Davis play even in a "silent.way," so to speak. To see him was to see intense musical genius in action and the band was great and rally in sync with him. The other trumpeter too soon gone that I'd love to have seen even just once is Clifford Brown but I'm ending this now because I'm on to Cincinnati.

Feilimid O'Broin said...

Correction: That should be Harold Battiste, not Baptiste. Typos will yet be my undoing. Now to listen to some North Carolina Gospel on this peaceful Summer Sunday morning on the western shore. I sure hope other folks start commenting on the great music on this blog and bloviate their opinions so I won't get so weary of seeing my own illogical crap here. I've lowered the bar for commentary so low that no one should hesitate to add their opinions. Oh yeah, and I'm on to Cincinnati!.

GuitarGus said...

Thanks for the high praise FOB my Irish Rover (of the mind these days) and invisible friend...My pal and vocalist Earl Green contributed greatly to the UK Blues scene and has appeared on many albums...as a soloist, as singer with Otis Grand and Paul Lamb...playing many European festivals etc.. He was Jamaican and arrived in the UK at 14...full of the music he had heard on his radio...coming from New Orleans et al He soon got into music...and had a GREAT time in the London 60's scene...We met in the early 70's formed a band and became support to many named bands...got fucked by a couple of managers but kept going...Eventually many moons later we formed The O T Band...primarily to play a mix of Blues R&B Soul Funk Jazz and Rock...Which we did for 1000's of gigs...What a laugh ! ...Alas Earl will be heard no more...due to illness..So for those interested here is a link to some early recordings...https://mega.co.nz/#!GAckmDBS!hQMIEd0Fx9fUUDtSQ59nTbcnlweMRUwjkIhMSihQpRk

And here is a link to a Very relaxed gig at a local bar which shows Earl's cool charisma ...and his pleasure playing with his mates : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x14OohXvb3s&feature=youtu.be

Feilimid O'Broin said...

Gus, I'm very sorry to hear about Earl Green. I would love to have seen him in concert. Please pass on to him that, although not especially noteworthy, he has one American fan who went so far as to order his several of his albums from England because they were not available here (the Internet is a wonderful invention, indeed, for those of us who obsess about and must own music) and who wishes him greatly improved health and a long life. As with so many artists introduced by the King and others here, he is yet again one of those artists whose music I did not discover until after he ended his performing career and whom wish I had discovered a lot sooner. That relaxed style of singing and honeyed voice are memorable and, if his performances on YouTube are an accurate reflection of his talent and charisma, he should have acquired some renown here. As much as I have loved reggae since I first heard the late Danny "The News Dissector's Shechter’s 1972 special broadcast, which was a spectacular introduction to the music and the culture that served as its parents, on WBCN, Boston, I am glad that, unlike many of his fellow Jamaican immigrants to England, Green chose the road less traveled by and it made all the difference (thanks for the phrase, Mr. Frost). But, also based on YouTube, I find his live performances superior to his studio albums even though I enjoy them greatly. Your band and he did each other proud!!! In my uneducated musical opinion, if you look up the word ‘cool’ in the dictionary, at last in Oxford's, you should find a photograph of Earl Green.

Feilimid O'Broin said...

As an aside, I know the lack of comments drives the King to appropriate fits of anger and madness because of its connotation of ingratitude and, too, his desire that the music elicit comments and discussion from those who visit his blog, but what I really enjoy about this blog can't be articulated in words. How does one articulate well the emotion one feels when one hears a James Carr, Marva Wright, Arthur Alexander, Sam Dees, Coco Robicheaux, Carl LeBlanc, James Booker, James Govan, Blind John Davis, Alvin or J. P. Robinson, Lou Pride, or so many of the artists posted here for the first time? Or even the second or third? Not to mention the early recordings of Etta James and Irma Thomas? As my comments too often and so obviously show, I use far too many words to try to respond to the experience of listening to the music and fall far short of what I am trying to communicate, which is why I hated commenting at first and still dislike it … because I do it so verbosely and inadequately In addition, there's no price tag for what one learns from and appreciates about le Roi's write-ups, for example, about James Booker and the Esquerita - Little Richard - New Orleans collection. And let’s be frank, does a world without Unky Cliff as an invisible mentor to and tutor for his royal highness even make sense? Not to me and, with an appreciation of the Absurd, I am probably the last of the existentialists.

Feilimid O'Broin said...

Following Chitlin's is always, at least for me, a profoundly joyful experience that can't be well put into words because I love and am intensely passionate about music, although I am not a musician and cannot read music, and especially the experience of discovery. As I have often told my wife and youngest daughter, who too often object to the music and books I have amassed during my brief tenure on the planet, I will miss them dearly if they leave but be ecstatically grateful for the storage space for more music and books that their departure provides. The books that have been recommended here and which I’ve read and have yet to read, the E-books, especially those about music and musicians, you sent, Lazz's wonderful and witty collaborations in songwriting and his album... let's just note succinctly as I can, for a change, that none of it would have been and will continue to be possible without Chitlin's. After discovering Lazz’s songwriting, I purchased an album by Claire Martin because she sang two of his songs on it. I read about her as England’s premier jazz singer (premiere? after all, she is a woman) and now own four of her recordings. I offer the Martin episode as an example of the unforeseen and wonderful chain of events that often results from my frequenting here.

Feilimid O'Broin said...

Unlike le Roi and P-Mac, I don't live in New Orleans with its abundance of music venues, concerts, and festivals, or even London, and the financial obligations of being the primary breadwinner for, and time consumed in the raising of, my three daughters over a span of thirty five years (there's a fifteen and a half year span between the birth of my oldest and youngest daughters), as well as the adverse income of my health on my income over the past decade and a half meant and still mean in real terms that, aside from occasionally purchasing albums and compact discs, there's a marked shortage of funds for the enjoyment of live music or to purchase as much music as I want. As I have written before, this and a few other blogs serve as my de facto radio station and permit me the joys of listening to what I know as well as the indescribable joy of discovery.

I’ve read about many of the artists featured here whose music I had not heard but the experience of listening … I am out of vocabulary to adequately describe the difference. Moreover, aside from seeing and buying the soundtrack for the film "Say Amen, Somebody!" and hearing the music blared from the bedroom of her mother whenever I visited a very close friend before I left Boston twenty seven years ago, I had no exposure to gospel because of my resistance to all things religious, except as, inexplicable anomalies, Rastafarian, African, klezmer and Judeo-spanish, and indigenous music, after eight years of education at a Catholic high school and college. Just as I opened my mind and ears to alternative country and bluegrass during my ten years in Texas, I began listening to and appreciating gospel because of this blog. Granted I won't be spending a great deal of money on gospel for my collection, but, nonetheless, I enjoy and appreciate the music now. And acquiring appreciation for “wicked good” new music always enriches my life.

Feilimid O'Broin said...

Other than brief remarks in the Comments section of individual posts, this will be my last post for a time here or in the Chat Box. It’s time to let other more knowledgeable and better writers, as well as other novices or newcomers to this blog, respond and comment. But I wanted to thank you, Gus, for making me aware of Earl Green and le Roi and the other contributors for all they do with the dim hope that just maybe writing about the fervent appreciation of a few folks willing to comment will compensate le Roi for the silence of the masses. Hell, Google has killed and is still legally killing so many good and great blogs (yet another reason I am so ardently opposed to the death penalty) that we need to cherish those we still have and appreciate the efforts and dedication of those who create them.

As a resolute Luddite upon whom some knowledge of computer technology was forced by a job, I don’t understand what it takes to adapt music for posts but, if Poppachubby’s prior explanations are any indication, I know it is time-consuming and, at times, even arduous to get the right sound for a post. Then there’s the writing which, in le Roi’s case, is inspired and always informative (by writing the term “le Roi”, I am unilaterally awarding him Creole status in recognition of his adoption of New Orleans as his home and his celebration of its music and heritage in this blog). So I’ll end with thanks again, le Roi, and to you Gus for, at a minimum, the introduction to Mr. Green. Maybe this should be a private message sent to the both of you, but Earl Green is there for the discovery and I am hoping my remarks will entice a few more folks, if they get this far, to check YouTube and maybe, if they enjoy his music as much as I do, even buy it. That’s all for now; if I had to pay a tax on each word I write, I would have to had filed bankruptcy during the first year I began following this blog.

Feilimid O'Broin said...

Oh yeah, one more recommendation: Blue Dragon at http://jellyrollbaker.blogspot.com is that rare entity a blog that, in addition to blues, consistently posts zydeco music both from south Louisiana and the Creole diaspora in California. Lou Cypher has created something special and, if you like zydeco mixed with your blues, check it out et, s'il vous plait, laissez les bons temps rouler parce que les haricots ne sont jamais salés!

KingCake said...

Why does it sound like you are going somewhere my friend?

GuitarGus said...

And another freebie...Earls first solo album...'Feel The Fire' from 1996 when he won Blues Vocalist Of The Year...in the UK ,,, here : https://mega.co.nz/#!7dlmmTbS!xg2h_Rp0ZSDIowJr2_SsrR2mJgcKsYUa1iPcCYh6-Mo

Lou Cypher said...

@Fellimid O'Broin : I only just saw your comment about our blog Blue Dragon and I want to thank you very much. I just want to say I'm only an author there, someone who was invited to participate by the guy who started the blog, Blue DeVille. Still, thank you for your support, much appreciated.

Blue DeVille said...

Here is the guy that started the blog,out of necessity,lol. But Lou Cypher is a good friend,thanks Lou for your support and friendship.Good morning to all you guys.Sadly I don't visit enough and do blogwalking,simply don't have enough time in one day. This being said thank you for visiting and supporting Blue Dragon,we are honored. Kingcake,popachubby,pmac,Feilimid,....thanks. All very welcome!! Congrats on your blog KC ;)
Greetings from the heart

Anonymous said...

Friends: I'm looking for Mighty Sam McClain Live in Japan. This would be am LP rip-- don't think it made it to CD.
Drray3

Pete said...

Hi Kingcake,
Any chance of re-posting some of the "global village" tapes you did a couple of years back in conjuction with "uncle cliffy"?. I downloaded all 64 plus links but they are all now dead.
Kind regards,
Pete

clash said...

I noticed this was requested.
The Cosimo Matassa Story Volume 2 - Gumbo Ya Ya
Disc 1
http://www57.zippyshare.com/v/Yc7iiIFZ/file.html
Disc 2
http://www57.zippyshare.com/v/rfo29FNn/file.html
Disc 3
http://www57.zippyshare.com/v/rdAYDqCe/file.html
Disc 4
http://www57.zippyshare.com/v/suzvijvu/file.html

Anonymous said...

Mighty Sam Live In Japan. It is from CD.
http://ul.to/388s4mcs

Dave said...

I got a request for you lovely people..... This "Showmen" album was posted 12 months ago : The Showmen - Some Folks Don't Understand It {vinyl rip] any chance of a re-up..?
Thanks for all the music, much appreciated

GuitarGus said...

I'm a great lover of Muddy Waters...We all should know his Classic Chess recordings...but here is a late Chess album from 1974 that confirms his Blues sainthood...Unk In Funk...It's a gem...Get it here while you can... http://www8.zippyshare.com/v/0MFLRm5W/file.html

GuitarGus said...

Here is a real exclusive Chitlins treat...This was the first time I saw and met Robert Cray...I LOVE this guy...great voice great guitar...I was 31 and this was IT ! At one of our gigs I met a man & his son who went to this gig and recorded it on an early digital recorder ...and later they gave me a CD version
It's an audience recording but it's truly a great listen ...I have more if appreciated ....Only available On the KC brand...Sorry no covers...But I was bum to bum ...on a table with Earl's sister a great gig !
Get part 1 here :
http://www10.zippyshare.com/v/df0EGi6s/file.html

Feilimid O'Broin said...

Thanks for Mr. Cray, Gus. I was a fan when he first appeared, then entered my acoustic and folk blues, and songster phase and have been making my way back to re-appreciating him for the past year. Sadly one of my external drives died before I had a chance to back up all that was on it so I am now without 200 gigabytes of music that included some of Cray's recordings. I suppose one could argue that having a compact disc and tape collection and seven terabytes of music on my various drives is a bit excessive but as I age, I find it much more enjoyable and cheaper than quaffing a few Guinness or Bass.

One of the great ironies of growing up in the northeast of the United States is that, as a young teenager, I was introduced to the blues by English bands. Jack Bruce, Clapton, and others, even Mick Jagger, congenially, albeit unknowingly, introduced me via their recordings to the original artists. Even today I marvel at the in-depth knowledge of the genre that Europeans like you have of the genre. Then there are folks like Gérard Herzhaft who are truly in a league of their own. It really puts some of us to shame but then I recollect that prophets are never appreciated (and profits are egregiously meager) in their own country. Folks like Cray and Otis Taylor are not only preserving the genre, they are modernizing it and keeping it very much alive.

Also, le Roi, the change in season being what it is here on the western shore of the Chesapeake, my comments have been infrequent. Perhaps it's such as well, so much effusing can cause dehydration. While recovering, I have been visiting less frequently, commenting less, and often playing catch-up with posts. I apologize because you continue to post great music that warrants comments. Best wishes to all and, in particular, thanks, le Roi, for the Esquerita post.

Blue DeVille said...

@ Feilimid: Hey Brother,sorry to hear about the music that you lost,actually we were missing your visits and comments too. I hope you are recovering well .see you soon on Blue Dragon.You have some catching up to do :) Take care!

@Guitar Gus: Thank you for Muddy Waters and Robert Cray recordings ! :)

@ KC: We posted an album: Doug Legacy with the Zydeco Party Band - King Cake Party (dedicated to you LOL)

KingCake said...

Do you have any idea what you have lost Feli? We can work something out where I mail you a hard drive or something like that. When pmac lost his I gave him an edited hard drive backup

GuitarGus said...

Especially for my Irish Rover and bard of Irish/American/UK/& Everywhere Bluesville ...OK... old geezer like me...holding on to mortality as long as possible...it tastes good ! Here is part 2 of that gig that that made him a star here before the USA : I was there and remember it with well...Got to speak and shake hands after the gig...Robert Cray Band - Live At The Electric Ballroom Camden London 24 July 1985 - 2 plus...Tracks ! to 6 are a continuation of the Camden recording...Tracks 7 to 9 are BBC recordings of 3 tracks of the same gig that I taped on FM...and tracks 10 to 13 are my taped BBC FM broadcast of a live Eric Clapton Blues Night feat Robert Cray at the Royal Albert Hall on 3 Feb 1990
Get it here : http://www11.zippyshare.com/v/4gcBCQXT/file.html

Or here : https://mega.nz/#!yZVUSDpC!MlDRQImfv-FFPu-uWXBVw7fkCNsxnTUGp4ubSxyMuHk

kristophermc28 said...

Thanks for Unk In Funk GuitarGus!

GuitarGus said...

FOB ...and any others interested...Here is Earl Green live and totally improvised...Found this yesterday going through my files...The O T Band live at The Greyhound on 30 Jan 1987...playing what we called The Medley and a band intro to finish...I couldn't believe the energy ! It's raw gritty chaotic...but it has balls ! Hear or download it here :
http://www42.zippyshare.com/v/qUJk6oA1/file.html

GuitarGus said...

Sorry if I keep on trying to promote my friend UK Blues vocalist Earl Green ...but he deserves a greater recognition worldwide...UK Blues albums with Otis Grand and Paul Lamb...and many guest appearances on other friends albums ...he kept the Blues alive in the UK in bad music times

Feilimid O'Broin said...

No need to apologize, Gus, Green is great and had he sung reggae, might have gained more recognition which would be sad given his facility with the blues and r & b. Man, manyy thanks for the rest of Cray's performance. Le Roi, I've been wrestling with the upper respiratory demons and have been absent for a week so I apologize for the late response. I'll send you and E-mail to respond to your offer. Luckily I had some of what was lost backed up elsewhere but am naively hoping that I can figure out a way to recover the rest because I certainly can't pay for the price the good folks at Seacrest want to charge. As for that brand, we'll be parting ways because both the external hard drive and back-up drive I purchased two ears ago from them have bitten the dust within two months of one another. I have already loaded up the new computer with music and am now wrestling with the problems arising from Windows 10. I am almost at the point of returning to Windows 7. In the meantime the latest offerings are great and are keeping me sane. Funny how easily music restores mental euphoria!!!

Feilimid O'Broin said...

Thanks for the notes, Monsieur Devil, as some of Le Roi's regulars know, it's a fairly regular and seasonal malady so it's no big thing except it leaves me too wiped out to be my usual verbose self and I haven't yet figured out how to be succinct or pithy. By the way, I recommend that any fan of this blog, put on his or her hip boots and wade into the swampland of your and Monsieur Cypher's great blog especially if he or she likes music from south Louisiana and the blues. I really enjoy seeing and reading Le Roi's, P-Mac's, and Preslive's comments there. Of course, I'm still ecstatic about the Otis Taylor posts. He's been a favorite of mine for several years now, a truly unique voice in blues that leaves me in the same trance-line state that engulfs me when I listen to John Lee Hooker, Robert Johnson, Muddy Waters, Victoria Spivey, or the best of any of the three Kings of the blues. And any blues man or woman who wants to reclaim the African heritage of the banjo in his or her music is well worth a listening in my humble abode. I hope to see some Queen Ida there soon. Bye the bye, I've just finished listening to Gus' Earl Green post. A Jamaican Brit singing blues with an American accent; the man is the epitome of the African diaspora incarnate and his voice seduces you with its warmth like the best of brandies and leaves you just as intoxicated. He redefines the term "cool" in the best sense. I'm now listening to Johnny Copeland's daughter's latest. I do believe she does her Daddy proud. Saw her on Tavist Smiley last night and she told Tavist what my father told me forty five years ago when he first heard me play on the stereo John Fogerty's "Long As I Can See The Light" which was his favorite Creedence song; that is, that he (and now she) considered it a gospel tune. It made me wish m'athair was still here and of clear mind so I could could tell him that Shemekia agreed with him although some may assert that the observation was self-evident and m'athair and Ms. Copeland simply had and have, respectively, a keen sense of the obvious. As for her father and m'athair, I can say without hesitation, "Ní bheidh a leithéid ann arís." I must stop at Blue Hell this evening to catch up on the latest posts (and, no, le Roi does not pay me by the word). Please give my best to Mr. Cypher. You and he have caused me to wear out the remaining floor beneath my computer desk with furious tapping to the music of the snapbeans (les haricots ne sont jamais salés sur votre blog et c'est sans aucun doute qu'on on puisse toujours laisser les bon temps rouler là bas). Le Roi's responsible for the rest of the damage especially when he posts folks like Esquerita, Booker, Govan, Marva Wright, Percy Mayfield, and a host of others whose music I didn't know before I had the good fortune to stumble over here from the Crypt after searching for Jim Pepper's music. Serendipity is a marvelous phenomenon, n'est-ce pas?

pmac said...

Feil, KC saved my ass when my harddrive corrupted. I want to pay it forward. Send me your physical address, and I'll get a harddrive and make a copy of what KC gave me, plus everything else I have on mine. I'll mail it to you when I'm done copying. You can send me your address at pmacneworleans@gmail.

pmac said...

Oh, and Gus - merci for the 2nd offering of Cray.

Lou Cypher said...

@Feilimid O'Broin : I'm only discovering your latest comment now and as usual, it's a pleasure to read it. It is indeed gratifying to see someone's appreciation for what we do. It isn't the reason why I do it, but I must confess I like a positive feedback. Especially when the person who comments testifies about their true enjoyment. Now that brings a ray of sunshine into an otherwise grey-ish day. I'm talking about the weather here. Hey, I can do small talk too! LOL

Blue DeVille said...

@ Feilimid:
I had to laugh when I read your comment sir :)) especially the "...have caused me to wear out the remaining floor beneath my computer desk with furious tapping to the music of the snapbeans" and the "...I must stop at Blue Hell this evening.." hehehe
I want to tell you that I posted another André Williams for you and 2 Garibay albums a while ago, as you mentioned; Just to make sure you saw them. Greetings to KC and all the great people at this blog

MarcD said...

Hello,Does anyone have a Rudy Green (El Toro Records) compilation to share? Thank You!

GuitarGus said...

And here is my offering...A wonderful tribute to AT by various artists that I posted in Shares in the past ...Various - Rolling With The Punches - The Allen Toussaint Songbook... here: https://mega.nz/#!LMcS0JQA!eCBbPqvXFndjOr5WvylJUuyk0nRgHaZl_P2H2DpwzGI

Anonymous said...

Any possibility of a re-up on the George Jackson's? Would be most grateful. thanks.

rontokyo said...

Thanks for posting the previous request for the Nashborro Gospel set. Would I be pushing my luck asking for "Best Of Revelation Records 1959-1962"? Thanks for all your efforts!

MarcD said...

The Rudy Green is up and running at the Hey,Get Rhythm blog.

Anonymous said...

Please re-up Joe Haywood!
Thank you and Merry X-mas

clash said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
clash said...

Jessie Hill ‎– Naturally (1971) Vinyl @320
http://www94.zippyshare.com/v/EWqg4Hk7/file.html
http://www.discogs.com/Jessie-Hill-Naturally/master/343484

clash said...

The Golden Eagles ‎– Lightning And Thunder (1988) @320
http://www82.zippyshare.com/v/A1ML6sHm/file.html
http://www.discogs.com/Golden-Eagles-The-Lightning-And-Thunder/release/4216402

Cyril Neville ‎– New Orleans Cookin' (2000) CD @320
http://www82.zippyshare.com/v/xVnftzka/file.html
http://www.discogs.com/Cyril-Neville-New-Orleans-Cookin/release/5433268

Hack Bartholomew - Lifting Jesus Up, Down in New Orleans (2003) CD @320
http://www27.zippyshare.com/v/baCwdZL9/file.html
http://www.amazon.com/Lifting-Jesus-Down-New-Orleans/dp/B000KIBJDE

clash said...

Johnny Adams ‎– Chasing Rainbows...The Tan Canary New Orleans Soul 1969-1981(2CD) @320
Disc 1
http://www89.zippyshare.com/v/UARqYcNO/file.html
Disc 2
http://www89.zippyshare.com/v/WZcEVZbV/file.html
http://www.discogs.com/Johnny-Adams-Chasing-RainbowsThe-Tan-Canary-New-Orleans-Soul-1969-1981/release/6191448

Lou Cypher said...

Clash, thank you so much for your shares, especially from your 12:52 post, I had none of them!

clash said...

Is there any possibility of the Stompin' Crazed Rhythm 'N' Blues Pounders! series being reuploaded? I believe there were 27 volumes. Thank you.

clash said...

Various Artists – Deesu Records Story (2CD)@320
Disc 1
http://www30.zippyshare.com/v/HB98Zakb/file.html
Disc 2
http://www30.zippyshare.com/v/PJpOjskx/file.html
http://www.louisianamusicfactory.com/shop/compact-disc/various-artists-deesu-records-story-2-disc/

Tina said...

Do you have links the the files or where you share your 'Recommended Reading' list?

LesTP said...

I would appreciate a reup of the second volume of Where Southern Soul Began, that was posted here
http://deepsouthernsoul.blogspot.com/2014/05/where-southern-soul-began2-1955-1962.html

In return, here's the third volume in mp3@320kbps:

Where Southern Soul Began, Vol. 3: 1957-1963
CD1: http://www91.zippyshare.com/v/5cB1OGse/file.html
CD2: http://www91.zippyshare.com/v/ad4fPXTz/file.html

KingCake said...

@ Tina no, I am afraid those are hard copy books

GuitarGus said...

This is a compilation I made from vinyl direct from LP to a Yamaha digital recorder many moons ago...It has some great rare tunes amid some well known classics...Various Artists - Soulful & Blue 1...I have 2 others if interested...Get it here : http://www93.zippyshare.com/v/NjgPBMmX/file.html

Feilimid O'Broin said...

Tina and any other interested persons, Many of the books on the recommended reading list can be purchased used for reasonable prices from Amazon.com various sellers. I was fortunate to find nearly new copies of Charlie Gillett's "The Sound of the City" and Evan Eisenberg's philosophical meditation "The Recording Angel: Music, Records and Culture from Aristotle to Zappa", as well as several of the Guralnik books. Thank you, le Roi, for posting them in response to my initial request and to Gus for so richly supplementing the list. I have learned so much from them.

Gus, I'm mad for compilations and you have never disappointed, so I'm interested. Here on the western shore, the weather has been miserable here of late as Winter contests primacy with climate change and brings the usual maladies in the O'Broin home when the weather is schizophrenic, so a very belated happy New Years to all and here's hoping for a prosperous, healthy, and peaceful year for all as well. Many, many thanks, le Roi, for making 2015 a memorable year musically; nobody does it better.

Feilimid O'Broin said...

P. S. Thanks, Clash, for the great posts here and in Blue Hell. I love these blog within a blog recordings and appreciate all who understand the technology well enough to upload and contribute. My mental well- being, my music collection, and my children owe you all a great deal and fortunately the former youngsters, still living at home in their twenties, are open-minded enough to appreciate much of what I own, download, or buy. At times in my mundane delirium, I think the solution to the world's many problems could be resolved if more folks were obsessed with and willing to share music. It seems to work in creating a sense of community here and in Blue Hell. Speaking of community, is Lazz okay and merely frequenting more jazz oriented blogs? His Brazilian and African music contributions here were wonderful and I miss his erudite, ironic humor and still play his own recording. I consider him and Unky Cliff to be among the honored and honorable elders of my favorite blogs.

Feilimid O'Broin said...

Rest in peace, Ziggy Stardust, and thanks for all the years and transformations (cha-cha-changes, I suppose) of rock and pop music. Here are my scattered, biased, and not especially informed impressions in these small hours of the morning before dawn. Fair or not, his passing will garner much more publicity than Otis Clay’s or many of the artists who appear on this blog, but notwithstanding David Bowie was a true icon with a career spanning five decades. Whether singing with Bing Crosby or acting in, among other films, Nicolas Roeg’s “The Man Who Fell To Earth”, “Merry Christmas, Mr. Lawrence”, and portraying so perfectly Andy Warhol in “I Shot Andy Warhol,” Bowie was a singular and extraordinary talent and his passing serves as yet another reminder of our and our idols’ and icons’ mortality.

Just as John Lee Hooker captured the lure of the blues for a new generation and its just having to come out in “Boogie Children”; Muddy Waters slyly and humorously asserted the demand for acknowledgment of their manhood by many black veterans returning from war during the decade following World War II and encompassing Korea, from conflicts fought purportedly for the freedom of all Americans in other lands; Sam Cooke poignantly captured the hopes and aspirations of the Civil (Human) Rights movement in “A Change Is Gonna Come;” Aretha transformed Otis Redding’s “Respect” into a consciousness raising anthem demanding equality for women, and John Fogerty captured the zeitgeist of the Vietnam era in his searing “Fortunate Son”, Bowie captured in “Heroes” the desperate, violent, nihilistic, hubristic reaction of the Baader-Meinhof gang to the growing power and hyper-industrialization of and concomitant loss of meaningful community in a newly established west German state that too often ignored war criminals in its “reformed” political leadership. His performance of the song is more haunting in the German version he recorded. Like Otis Clay, Bowie’s music hearkens back to an era when more literary lyrics and expressive voice still mattered more than the beat and didactic and reductionist lyrics of much of today’s popular music.

What’s worse is so many artists who were essential to shaping our tastes in and our love of music are passing when they approach or just pass age 70, too young in an era in which longevity is supposed to be increasing. I am usually not nostalgic about the arts because I always look forward to discovering new literature, music, etc., but sadly I have realized that my music collection has now come to have many more artists who are gone than who are still with us. Foolishly I persuaded myself at times that Bowie would outlive me, just as I assumed the same about B. B. King and other aging greats. After all that talent and creativity could not translate into their experiencing the same mundane mortality that my friends and I have experienced or will experience.

Feilimid O'Broin said...

When I listen to the music my youngest daughter and her friends enjoy, I find it lacks the diversity of the music we enjoyed when their age in an era when AM and FM radio stations played an eclectic list of music that covered numerous genres and, too, almost everyone listened to the same stations. Technology has provided many more formats, specialization, and music via the Internet. Still, I find, perhaps wrongly, that music today often lacks the willingness to experiment and the unrestrained creativity and merging of diverse influences of the popular music we heard when record companies’ budgets were still in the black and artists were held on the rolls much longer regardless of the success of their latest releases. Like today’s professional football coaches, artists are afforded much less time to succeed unless they strike out on their own and utilize creative sites like Bandcamp to gain an audience. I still think Buddy Guy, Leon Russell, Mavis Staples, Taj Mahal, Clapton, and many other musical artists will obtain some purchase on immortality in my view of what a just world should mean. Great talent deserves great life spans.

As I hear the media comment on how young 69 is today, I think that Clay was only four years older when he died. There’s something inherently unfair about artists who have entertained us for decades and, in doing so, weathered the less pleasant aspects of the music industry and the years of youthful excess but who, like Clay and Bowie, are denied great longevity. Not young enough to be forever young in our memories as Hendrix, Joplin, Redding, Bessie Smith, Robert Johnson, and others are, but too young to make sense when the seemingly indestructible Keith Richards continues to survive his many demons and excesses, even outlasting that other legendary chemist Lou Reed. If he eve markets his genes to science, he'll make a fortune. Fortunately I can immerse myself in listening to the recent Clay posts and hold to the idea that he still lives through his music. It still doesn’t compensate for the sense of loss and I will feel the same way about David Bowie while remembering his early releases and the acclaim that greeted him when he created the persona of Ziggy Stardust and his music echoed through the halls of my college dorm.

What remains best about this blog to me is its frequent stories about and exposition of the work of Southern soul and New Orleans artists who often achieved at best regional fame but are relatively unknown to non-musicians and folks lacking a deep knowledge of Southern soul or music from New Orleans. And please excuse the rambling verbosity as I again try to cobble together a few meandering thoughts after another sleepless night. By the way, the soundtrack as I wrote this is your latest mix and David Ruffin has just finished singing. The mixing of deep southern Soul artists like O. V. Wright with Gaye, Ruffin, and other members of Motown's finest really works and yet emphasizes what I said about my record collection. Nonetheless, it still makes for great listening and is a great way to begin the new day. As always, many, many thanks.

Feilimid O'Broin said...

Correction: Bowie played Warhol in "Basquiat." Please excuse the memory's deficits.

Chocoreve said...

Thanks for your great blog !
Please repost http://deepsouthernsoul.blogspot.fr/2013/11/the-sound-of-city-new-orleans.html
Many thanks !!

Steve626 said...

I was wondering if you could repost the Johnny Adams live in New Orleans - http://deepsouthernsoul.blogspot.com/2014/01/johnny-adams-live-in-new-orleans.html

Thanks

Mescalero said...

Hello,
is it possible to re-up:

Emotionally Yours - Black America's Love Affair With Bob Dylan
http://deepsouthernsoul.blogspot.co.id/2013/08/emotionally-yours-black-americas-secret.html

Thanks in advance

Alanmb43 said...

Hi love the blog, please could you re-up http://deepsouthernsoul.blogspot.co.uk/2014/01/johnny-adams-sings-pomus-and-mayfield.html, much appreciated

Impeach President Palin said...

Hello friend,

JUST discovered this incredible blog. Is there any way to re-up this Sensational Nightingales collection. It is a crime again humanity that most of their Peacock stuff is not available. Many thanks.

http://deepsouthernsoul.blogspot.com/2012/09/the-sensational-nightingales-on-peacock.html#comment-form

Lil'ol'lady said...

Hi, KingCake, while lurking other blues sites, I discovered this gem. I did not know if you already knew about or were even interested in this, but you are a huge James Booker fan, right?
http://zapopan-pureblues.blogspot.com/search?updated-max=2015-11-12T08:59:00-08:00&max-results=20&reverse-paginate=true
Oh, what a pianist!

MarcD said...

Hi there,

Can someone please help me out with scans of the liner notes booklet to 'Ashes to Ashes' - Charles Smith (Soulscape CD)

Thank you

the Octagon said...

Could anyone repost the Spencer Wiggins sets and Percy Sledge Sings Country for me? I'm very eager to hear those.

drhepcat said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Anonymous said...

Hello King Cake,

I would really appreciate a reup of the first volume of Where Southern Soul Began, that was posted here

http://deepsouthernsoul.blogspot.co.at/2014/05/where-southern-soul-began.html

as well as of the Betty Harris CD, if you have time and feel like it, of course:

http://deepsouthernsoul.blogspot.co.at/2013/09/betty-harris-soul-perfection-plus.html

thank you very much in advance for your time and consideration, this would make me very happy to hear these rare gems.

Steve Stoddard said...

Is there any chance "Howard Tate - Get It While You Can (The Legendary Sessions)" could be re-posted? Mahalo nui loa for maintaining this great, highly informative blog. Peace and Good Blues!

Anton Lijs said...

Hi Guys, Thanks For Loads Of Music..Really Nice. I Would Like To Make A Little Request About Bobby Marchan The Soul Sides. Cheers!

Alanmb43 said...

Hi everyone, bit of a long shot after hearing of the sad passing of the great CL Blast can anybody post up a link for the elusive "Made in Africa" lp, I would be very grateful

Chi-Town said...

Hi KingCake,
I just discovered your blog, and wow, what a blog it is!! Could you re-post the "Duke Of Soul" series at http://deepsouthernsoul.blogspot.com/2014/10/the-duke-of-soul-volumes-1-7.html ???

I would be grateful. Thanks

Chi-Town

Anonymous said...

Hi folks,
haven't been around for more than a year. Very glad to find this place still alive and well!

Was just discussing with a friend the amazing output of Chips Moman's American Sound Studios, which brings me to my request:

Would it be possible, please, to re-up "Spencer Wiggins - The Complete Goldwax Singles"?

And does anyone have "Memphis Boys-the Story of American Studios" on Ace Records?

Thans in advance, Le Porc Rouge

P.S.: Why ist it there's no King Curtis here on the side?

D0dge57 said...

Hi KC, I've just been listening to the Howard Tate Get It While You Can album, what a great album from a fine singer - so I thought I'd reciprocate with his Rediscovered album from 2004 that I've uploaded for the site - I've added a review and cover if you want to post it. The tunes are a bit more contemporary but Howard's voice is still very soulful and there some great horn arrangements giving it a retro feel. I hope you and your followers enjoy it: https://mega.nz/#!ogNXzRBY!Rlbs9045nQKjj9Gcl1I713z2bs8CBUFtt3-yiFsBwuU

Sergej said...

Hi.
Please can you re-upload Mahalia Jackson Sings The Best Loved Hymns Of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr ?
Thank you very much.

Lil'ol'lady said...

Greetings, KingCake. I've missed the gospel posts you were doing and for which I was always very grateful. Blues, soul and funk are also favorites. 1. Would you reconsider posting gospel again? 2. Do you(or any kind soul) have any Junior Kimbrough that could be shared? My gratitude and appreciation for wonderful blogs such as yours know no bounds. Hope you haven't missed my whining too much! Thanks for all you do.

Lou Cypher said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
LAZZ said...

Here's a back room about which I had forgotten.
Full of cool new playmates.
Yeeha!!

dodge_57 said...

Hi, would it be possible to reup the three James Carr cds that are in your archives. – A Man Needs A Woman, You've Got My Mind Messed Up and Complete Goldwax Singles – thank you very much.


Anonymous said...

Hi I have been looking for Otis Rush Cobra Recordings and Johnnie Taylors Live at the Summit club it would be amazing if you could upload these. Your site is really great thanks for the time you have put in it has taught me a lot.

Anonymous said...

Here is the link to the otis rush page - https://deepsouthernsoul.blogspot.com/2012/07/otis-rush-cobra-recordings-1956-58.html

Lou Cypher said...

@Anonymous: On our blog, we generally don't reply to anonymous comments. It's easy to use a name, nickname, pseudo, aka, without even signing in with a Google account. Nevertheless, I'll make an exception today to let you know, and I hope Kingcake won't mind that I'm using his blog to advertize ours, that the Johnnie Taylor album you're looking for was posted earlier this year on our Blue Dragon blog. The blog is listed in this one's "Places of interest" on the right. Pay us a visit, use the search engine there, you'll find the Johnnie Taylor album. DL links are still valid.

rfp3 said...

Thanks for the advice. I had posted the Otis Rush/johnnie Taylor comments as anonymous. I went ahead and created an account I will use to post from now on thanks for the help. I am way stoked for the johnnie Taylor album!!!! I am on my way to mammoth mountain for the weekend so I will have some road jams!! Thanks!!

Lou Cypher said...

Poppachubby: Don't bother about my Louis Jordan re-up request - unless of course others might be interested - I deleted my comment as someone from this place generously shared it with me. So I have to thank you both, it really made my day! :)

alex said...

hi kingcake!
can you please re-up spencer wiggins-feed the flame the fame and xl recordings,
missed this first time around..
many thanks once again man!

dodge_57 said...

Hi everybody, here is some more ZZ Hill on Malaco which might have been missed, i can't see it here anywhere. It's his Bluesmaster album, released in 1984 the year of his untimely passing and contains one of his best ever songs "I'm Gonna Stop You From Givin' Me The Blues". Incidentally I think that the 601 Music cd is a series of discs that Malaco released as a sort of best of cheaper cd with only 10 tracks, I have several by different artists. Enjoy
http://www65.zippyshare.com/v/XesohdJj/file.html
PS Any chance of a reup on the 3 James Carr ds? Thanks

GuitarGus said...

Here is Buddy Guy - Born to Play Guitar (2015)
It's worth a listen guys...believe me
http://www36.zippyshare.com/v/vWkzRCnL/file.html

GuitarGus said...

Here is Buddy Guy - Born to Play Guitar (2015)
It's worth a listen guys...believe me
http://www36.zippyshare.com/v/vWkzRCnL/file.html

pmac said...

Thanks, Gus!

Feilimid O'Broin said...

Thanks so much, Gus. I love Buddy Guy and hope he's with us forever. Losing so many great musicians in the past few years is getting wearisome. My music collection resembles a cemetary more and more so I'm thrilled that Guy is healthy and still recording.

Anonymous said...

Posted a comment under an old link for Memphis Minnie V1 - the first published Blues Classics.
I remarked that I couldn't believe it may have been 3 decades since I bought this album in Ireland, Murray's of Dun Laoghaire, Happened to mention this to my good lady and she told me that it was 4 decades and change!
So here is the request repeated again (updated) If someone could help out with BC1 I would be very thankful.
Great site by the way.go raibh maith agat (no agaibh) Bottleneck

Anonymous said...

So an Eldridge Holmes re-post is out of the question? Hope not - thanx-in-advance!

Nick said...

KC: would you mind reposting that great 1971 Snooks Eaglin album?
http://deepsouthernsoul.blogspot.com/2012/09/snooks-eaglin-and-his-new-orleans.html

I didn't remember that I'd posted a comment about it 4 years ago (!), but the other day it struck me that I really wanted to listen to it, bur that the files were lost in a HD crash a while back.

thank you!!

dS said...

Can you please, please, please re-up the Bear Family Blowing the Fuse collection? All of the links are dead...
Thanks for the great blog!!!

Tom said...

This really is one of my favorite little (very fertile) corners of the web. I especially appreciate the gospel posts, as I've become increasingly interested in that music this year. Any chance you could re-up the Rev. Claude Jeter album from several years back? Thanks so much!

bwunderlick said...

Would anyone be so kind as to re-up the two volumes of "Overcome! Preaching in Rhythm and Funk"?

brambleman said...

Can you please re-post The Kelly Brothers? Thanks!

rivercityslim said...

I've been scouring the internet trying to find copies of the two albums Jerry LaCroix did under his own name in the early 70's. I thought this bunch might have some ideas. Meanwhile, Merry Christmas and thanks for all the great music this year!

brambleman said...

Please re-post Kelly Brothers? Thanks!

GuitarGus said...

Eddie Jefferson - The Main Man (featuring his version of 'Jeannine') Got a viny rip at grumpy's...Loved the complete album...So I ordered the CD version...arrived this morning...My rip in flac and full scans...Here : http://www46.zippyshare.com/v/nc6SbgrD/file.html Or here : https://mega.nz/#!ONdRyRrZ!lN0V5SlYBMEWK9X6O81YQ6Y9jRvTPgqHAQLma8vSsBE

jonnipoika said...

can you re-post the donnie elbert albums

Anonymous said...

Hello,
I'm looking for Martha Bass "I'm so grateful".
Thank you.

Horatiu

Anonymous said...

hoping for a re-up of the Carter Brothers - thanx-in-advance !

Ricardo M said...

Great post on Sugar Pie Desanto and great blog! Thanks. I'm looking for her first álbum Sugar Pie (https://www.discogs.com/es/Sugar-Pie-DeSanto-Sugar-Pie/release/5217763). Any help would be much appreciated. Thanks

Guitarradeplastico your favorite musician said...

many thanks:
GuitarGus for Eddie Jefferson - The Main Man

Guitarradeplastico your favorite musician said...

I have WANTED :
VA-Doo-Wop Soul, Vol. 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11

PaShaun said...

Could you upload Roy C. Hammond?

GuitarGus said...

For those who haven't got this...(Shame on you !) It's a must have... Various Artists - Mardi Gras In New Orleans (1987) 320 My Rip & Full Scans...Here : http://www53.zippyshare.com/v/USVhdq5E/file.html

Anonymous said...

The Carter Brothers - Blues On Tour please re-up?

alex said...

hi kingcake,can i request TONY PWENS-I GOT SOUL please?
missed both posts and links now dead.
thankyou

alex said...

hi guys,for anyone that wants this brilliant slab o soul here is a link
courtesy of crazylegs,thank you man!

http://www40.zippyshare.com/v/dtqjuCSo/file.html


enjoy!

alex said...

tony owens-i got soul- ABOVE!

Chi-Town said...

Hi kingCake,
Your post of Dave Bartholomew at http://deepsouthernsoul.blogspot.com/2014/02/spirit-of-new-orleans-genius-of-dave.html looks mighty interesting. Unfortunately the embedupload and zippy links are dead. Could you please re-up this gem when you have time? Thanks!!

Great blog by the way.

Chi-Town

Alanmb43 said...

Hi Kingcake, loving the blog, any chance of a re-up of the Brother Tyrone, Thanks

clash said...

Hoping the folks who visit your great site will dig this.
Various Artists – Shreveport Southern Soul…The Murco Story CD @320
http://www82.zippyshare.com/v/C8nyrNbS/file.html
https://www.discogs.com/Various-Shreveport-Southern-Soul-The-Murco-Story/release/3435868

Lil'ol'lady said...

Hello, KingCake,
Simply want to thank you for the wonderful Vee Jay compilations, particularly disc 9. After waiting 4 months for a family friend to install a new hard drive in my computer, it is such a relief to see you are in full swing. Thanks for the treasures and thanks for the generous gospel offerings in particular. Lil'ol'lady

Nadim Abraham said...

hello kingcake all the Barbara Lewis links are dead any chance of re up please great singer and great blog you have

Alanmb43 said...

Hi Kingcake, please could you re-up Eddie King & Mae Bee Mae - The Blues Has Got Me, thanks

clash said...

Various Artists ‎– The Instant And Minit Story (2005) 3CD box @320
disc one - Hits By The Minit
http://www44.zippyshare.com/v/9BZbUa4D/file.html
disc two - In An Instant
http://www44.zippyshare.com/v/azJXk997/file.html
disc three - From the Vaults
http://www44.zippyshare.com/v/hvEPxv5r/file.html

https://www.discogs.com/Various-The-Instant-And-Minit-Story-/release/4825267

clash said...

The Chronological James "Sugarboy" Crawford: 1953-1954 (CD) @320
http://www24.zippyshare.com/v/tkmHDa3N/file.html 1. I Don't Know What I'll Do
https://www.amazon.com/1953-1954-James-Sugarboy-Crawford/dp/B0009ORGOA

LAZZ said...

Thank you, clash.

Anonymous said...

Please re-up this: http://deepsouthernsoul.blogspot.co.uk/2012/08/clarence-carter-early-fame-singles-1966.html#comment-form

D0dge57 said...

Here is some payback for the recent excellent posts. It is Ollie & The Nightingales self-titled album on Stax from 1969 with one added track their biggest hit I've Got A Sure Thing which wasn't on the album (I've added some notes on the group).
http://www43.zippyshare.com/v/k80XG5bm/file.html

GuitarGus said...

Thanks DOdge57 Nice album I didn't know about
Cheers

GuitarGus said...

Not really suitable here...so the start of my Rhythm & Blues Juke-Box Selection is here : http://poppachubby.blogspot.co.uk/

rontokyo said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
rontokyo said...

If you've got it, could you please post "Back to the Crossroads: The Roots of Robert Johnson." This is an expanded edition of "Roots of RJ." Thanks.

Anonymous said...

What a fantastic blog!!! If possible, please re-upload Ella Washington - He Called Me Baby (https://deepsouthernsoul.blogspot.co.uk/2012/12/ella-washington-he-called-me-baby.html)
and Sam Baker - I Believe In You (https://deepsouthernsoul.blogspot.co.uk/2014/07/sam-baker-i-believe-in-you.html).
Many thanks!!!

pmac said...

I just checked the last download links for both Ella Washington and Sam Baker, and the mediafire links are still alive.

Anonymous said...

Thanks for the reply pmac! Just tried the links via Google Chrome instead of Firefox and all is good!!!

Untitled said...

Recently picked up the MFSL CD of Sensational Nightingales Heart And Soul/You Know Not The Hour. a search for Sensational Nightingales FLAC led me here.

i know it's a long shot but i saw a two of these posted here in mp3 format. could anyone do lossless rips of It's Gonna Rain Again, Prayed Too Late and/or The Best Of? i could reciprocate by posting my lossless rip of the aforementioned MFSL disc!

Anonymous said...

Any chance of a repost of the Duke Of Soul volumes? Thanks...

Anonymous said...

re-up please Blowing the Fuse series thank you

OkieRambler said...

Hi, I just found your blog. This is amazing! Thank you so much. Is there any chance you could repost the Otis Clay and/or Johnny Rawls material? Somehow, I missed them over the years and I'd like to catch up. Thank you for everything you do!

soul quinquin said...

Hello,
Could you repeat the len of Rhonda Washington - Good Woman Turning Bad because that is dead. Aec ms thanks ticipés.
Pierre

clash said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
maltshophop said...

KingCake could you please re-upload this album. The Campbell Brothers - Beyond the 4 Walls. If possible can you please include the artwork. The Campbell Brothers are one of the very best exponents of Sacred Steel and are a firebrand of a group. For those uninitiated hearing them for the first time will be an exciting one. Thanking you in advance for any help at all. Regards Peter

soul quinquin said...

Hello,
Oh please, being a big fan of the Stax label, could you redo the link of Rhonda Washington - Good Woman Turning Bad because that one is dead. Thank you in advance .
Pierre

pmac said...

Clash - sterling link is broken. Music looks great - can you fix it?

clash said...

New rip with better cartridge.
Skip Easterling ‎– Taking Inventory (1988) Vinyl @320
https://www.discogs.com/sell/release/3715966?ev=rb
Skip Easterling ‎– Meat Rack Tavern / So In Love Are We 7" (1985) @320
https://www.discogs.com/Skip-Easterling-Meat-Rack-Tavern-So-In-Love-Are-We/release/3012695
Skip Easterling - Walking On Edges / O de O, O de O Doe de O 7" (1973) @320
http://collectorsfrenzy.com/details/351271296419/rare_New_Orleans_Soul_45_SKIP_EASTERLING_walking_on_edges_INSTANT_Hear
All in one zip file
http://www32.zippyshare.com/v/q049A5HY/file.html

clash said...

@pmac
This should work fine.

pmac said...

@Clash: Got it!!! Many, many thanks.

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